March 23rd 1920

Poems for the Easter Term edition of the ‘Draconian’ have now been selected. Two boys have the distinction of having two poems selected – George Harwood and John Betjemann.

Both of them wrote on the subject of ‘Dawn’. First, here is George Harwood’s poem:

DAWN

Now rejoice, all ye men, for the earth is untwined
   From the talons of night, dank and dread,
Aurora and Zephyr, the gentle Sun-wind,
   Are warming the East with soft red.

The dewdrops appear, brilliant gems on the ground;
   Or, encircling the Hyacinth fair,
They rest on the herbage, and all things around
   Are bright in the fresh morning air.

Quiet through the undergrowth hid from our sight
   Hurries cottontail cheerful and gay,
And in the blue heavens with heart pure and white
   Chants the skylark, blithe herald of day.

                              G. Harwood (age 11)

John Betjemann’s poem is in a different style:

DAWN

Ever ting-a-linging my bedroom clock is ringing,
     Ringing, ringing,
As the sun breaks in the east;
     And, stretching with a yawn,
     I curse the lovely dawn,
And wait in moody silence till the bedroom clock has ceased.

I've read the poet's rhymes about early morning chimes
     At awful times;
And the sun through window panes;
     The little birds twitting
     And the big ones flitting.
But poets never write about the dawning when it rains.
                       
                              J. Betjemann (age 13)

Poems were also submitted on the themes of ‘Babies’ and ‘Pets’. We had an “Ode to a Cat’, ‘A Baby Bunny’ and this, in the style of a nursery rhyme, from Betjemann:

ODE TO A PUPPY
(By His Mistress)

Oh! puppy dear, I sadly fear
   Your waistcoat's at the wash,
Your cutlet, too, is soaked right through
   With all your lemon squash.

'Now who did this?' Give me a kiss,
   Don't sulk, dear, or look haughty;
I know my pet will not forget
   To say that he was naughty.
Your little nose that sniffs and blows!
   Your little mouth that yawns!
That pretty howl! and Daddy's scowl
   When you tread on his corns!

Those dinky legs like little pegs
   That spoil the drawing-room floors!
That dainty mat whereon you pat
   Your ducky muddy paws!

Now with this praise my pet will gaze
   With truth in both his eyes,
And mummy's mind is always kind
   In case her doggy dies

                         J. Betjemann (age 13)